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<  Design concepts  ~  Instruction Manuals, Drinks and Food

edenb
Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 9:46 am Reply with quote
Joined: 10 Jul 2007 Posts: 42
I think it'd be cool if some games were served with food and drinks.
Why?
Because games are a multi-sensory experience. The food and drinks could enhance this.
Of course, the problem we have with this is that most games require both hands. Maybe it'd work better as a pre-game meal, or with a one handed wii game. Maybe a mouse only game.

What about manuals?
I've always thought that games have three parts to them- before game, after game, and in game. Manuals kind of act as a good before game thing, especially if they're done well. Think of music albums, how they sometimes have an interesting booklet inside.

Just some eccentric ramblings of mine Razz
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Vrav
Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 10:15 am Reply with quote
Joined: 25 Oct 2007 Posts: 168 Location: Oregon
I have recently come to agree with some that a game should be playable with no preemptive instruction. And not just, say, have in-game instruction teaching you how to play; the experience should be as intuitive and natural as possible.

Of course, this isn't really feasible for very complex games with the current user interface of mice and keyboards. It should be exciting to see what the future brings to replace them.

Just found this in a Google search: http://www.emotiv.com/

If the technology can read your mind, perhaps it will soon be able to (safely, I hope!) induce sensation and feeling, allowing the inclusion of ultimate sensory feedback reaching far beyond the current limitation to sight and hearing. Not only this, but imagine a game that can read your emotions, feelings. How much more context-sensitive and procedurally relevant need a game's process be, than that; a horror game that knows if you are scared or not? Scary, itself.

Another thought: could we electronically control the brain's perception of time? One could interact in a virtual environment for hours at a higher speed, when in reality it has been a fraction of that time. This raises suspicion... are we currently experiencing a limited simulation, which we will in time awaken from, to an existence far advanced beyond our own? Is this life provided as concrete, vivid amusement in place of a greater existence? I should hope we make the best of it regardless. And if we believe there is more to life just as there is more outside the limited reality provided by a computer game, that there is an outside and a higher level (and must not there always be?), then more so for the glory of it ought we find the best within ourselves, and make, comfortably or not, the most of what we're given. [/silliness]

Gaming as religion, there. What virtual allows, reality and our imaginations transcend; as meditation for realizing greater existence than we have yet experienced, placing one's attention on the miniature storytelling of man's own creation draws in turn outward attention to the clear magnificence of what we have already. To think that we may yet transcend this most limited perception further. When you're in a game, do you sit around and mope because you don't think you can do whatever it is you're there to do? No, you set right on ahead. So why do we, in reality, focus on the negative, and keep ourselves unhappy, when we have been given, no matter the upbringing or chance circumstances, everything to be what it is we are destined to be.

Getting back to the Emotiv advent, they say you can think "I want to lift this thing," and it will be done; in reality here, where we can do such things physically without issue, a similar intention can control more the direction and quality of our lives (I pull this from the teachings of Wayne Dyer, regarding the power of "intention"). It's a multi-tiered analogy of sorts, to say games are to reality as reality is to what we would like to achieve, but believe we cannot; using games as an introspective platform for external realization, one can understand the... ohh, just read Flatland. That's the sort of thing I'm getting at.

Sorry to derail your thread on the second post. Ignore at will.
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Michael
Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 11:11 am Reply with quote
Site Administrator Joined: 07 Jun 2002 Posts: 8065 Location: Gent, Belgium
edenb wrote:
Of course, the problem we have with this is that most games require both hands.

You could use eating itself as input. There's many experiments with alternative input hardware in media arts. Visit Ars Electronica for inspiration some time.
In fact, friends of ours, Foam, us food as one of their media, next to computers. They cook art. And they're very interested in play. They would probably come up with a great system! (and tasty too! Smile )
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Michael
Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 11:13 am Reply with quote
Site Administrator Joined: 07 Jun 2002 Posts: 8065 Location: Gent, Belgium
Vrav wrote:
I have recently come to agree with some that a game should be playable with no preemptive instruction. And not just, say, have in-game instruction teaching you how to play; the experience should be as intuitive and natural as possible.

I wholeheartedly agree. And this applies to both the mechanics and the story, I think. I like it when you can just start playing a game and not have to go through a whole tutorial or backstory exposition.
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Michael
Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 11:19 am Reply with quote
Site Administrator Joined: 07 Jun 2002 Posts: 8065 Location: Gent, Belgium
Vrav wrote:
Gaming as religion, there. What virtual allows, reality and our imaginations transcend;
(...)

Question Isn't this what art does?
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Vrav
Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 11:27 am Reply with quote
Joined: 25 Oct 2007 Posts: 168 Location: Oregon
You're right, I must simply be in a "games as art!" craze since discovering your writings and ideas, as well as the wonderful discussions here on the forums.
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Lyrak
Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 4:51 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 29 Jul 2007 Posts: 1139 Location: Some Ohio Cornfield
*shudders* All I can say is, I have heard of the development of the "mind-reading" technology, and given the current state of the world (and how many sleazeballs are in it), I really don't like the sound of it.... I mean, maybe I've just read 1984 one too many times, but it does worry me. I mean, I suppose any technology has its ups and downs, but I'd honestly rather have around a technology that could kill me than one that could give people a window into my mind. There are just too many people out there who would love to get their hands on stuff like that... it makes me nervous.

If ALL it reads is emotions, or just elevated activity levels (like a lie detector test or a mood ring or something as simple as that), fine, okay, that I can live with. But if there ever is a time when it becomes advanced enough to control our perceptions and read more than just those simple things... then it becomes a question of "yes, we can... but should we?" And I would advise something that advanced, even for innocent intent, be destroyed. Such a technology could make zealots even more dangerous than they already can be.

But, back to the main topic, how exactly would eating be used as an input, I wonder? I'd like to hear some elaboration on this, because I keep picturing a chili cheesedog with a computerized thing inside it that you're munching down, and somehow that's just creepy. o.o
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Michael
Posted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 8:03 pm Reply with quote
Site Administrator Joined: 07 Jun 2002 Posts: 8065 Location: Gent, Belgium
Lyrak wrote:
given the current state of the world (and how many sleazeballs are in it), I really don't like the sound of it....

hear hear

Lyrak wrote:
I keep picturing a chili cheesedog

I think we'll first need food that is a bit more interesting... Rolling Eyes

You can use practically anything for input if you record it with video and then analyse the picture. That could be one way. Another could be the sound people make. A third the position of food and plates and cuttlery on the table. The time between actions. Or perhaps all of these things together.

I don't think the food itself should be the input device. But the act of eating could be the way in which you interact with the project.
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edenb
Posted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 2:50 am Reply with quote
Joined: 10 Jul 2007 Posts: 42
It's always interesting to think about interacting with games in different ways.
Edible controllers could be interesting Razz

Actually, maybe the wiimote's built in speaker could help in this case- making the sounds that you hear when you eat (cooking mama?).

Quote:
I have recently come to agree with some that a game should be playable with no preemptive instruction. And not just, say, have in-game instruction teaching you how to play; the experience should be as intuitive and natural as possible.


Indeed. I just think it'd be fun if you could have a manual that really doesn't have much to do with the game. Just something entertaining and trippy.
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Lyrak
Posted: Tue Oct 30, 2007 3:41 am Reply with quote
Joined: 29 Jul 2007 Posts: 1139 Location: Some Ohio Cornfield
XDD Sorry, the chili cheesedog is a result of me watching way too much Corner Gas (fun show, really - one of the first in a while where I don't have to wonder if my parents are going to start complaining about something in it... but that's besides the point).

And kind of an interesting theory for an input device (I'm not sure I would want an edible controller... I mean, what goes in must come out... and not in a pretty way LOL). Though for some reason now my brain is going "wii manners", where all your miis are sitting at a table, and if you put the shrimp fork and the salad fork in the wrong places, you lose points. And you get yelled at for eating too loud. XD
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